Blog

What is the Web Animations API?

In the context of web apps, animation is nothing more than the visualization of change over a specified duration. This visualization of change is very important because when done right we can use this to dramatically increase the user experience of an app and make our apps feel more refined and well designed.

At the highest level, the Web Animations API is a standardized JavaScript API which is baked into browsers that allows developers to animate DOM elements. CSS was always been the most performant way to animate on the web because the CSS animations engine can run animations on the GPU instead of the CPU allowing us to achieve smooth 60 fps animations. The Web Animations API finally allows us to write animation logic using JavaScript and opens up the browsers animation engine allowing us to run these animations on the GPU. As well as performant animations there are host of other benefits the Web Animations API provides us. Because it is a JavaScript API we can easily create dynamic animations by altering durations, easing methods and other variables; something which is very hard to do in CSS. The API provides very flexible playback control which allows us to Pause, Rewind, Skip and even change the rate of playback and more. The API is Promise based so it is really easy to chain multiple animations or run other logic when the animation completes. And because the Web Animations API is a browser feature there are no external dependencies to manage or maintain. Today most JavaScript libraries take a component based approach. Whether that’s using Angular, React, VueJS or just native web components the Web Animations API fits in with this architecture because the JavaScript used to create this animations can be embedded into the components easily without any dependencies. These are great benefits provided by the Web Animations API which we can use to harness the power of the GPU to create silky smooth animations that are dynamic and flexible.

Learning the Angular CLI

Exploring the Angular Command Line Interface (CLI)

Installing the CLI

sudo npm install -g @angular/cli
ng --version

Using the CLI

ng --help
ng build --help

Creating New Angular Projects

The ng new command

ng new app-name

New project generation options

ng new --help
ng new app-name --routing
ng new app-name --style=scss --routing --dry-run
ng new app-name --style=scss --routing --prefix=vsrao

Serving Angular Applications for Development

The ng serve command

ng serve --help
ng serve
ng serve --open

Customizing the development server

ng serve --port=8000 --open
ng serve --host=whatever.dev.company.com --open

Generating Angular Application Code

Creating new code with blueprints

With the Angular CLI you can generate the different entities used to build your application. You will be able to easily generate Components, Directives, Services, Pipes, Models and Interfaces, Route Guards and Modules. When generating a blueprint, your command will follow the following template:

ng generate [schematic] [name] [options...]
ng generate --help

Available schematics: application, class, component, directive, enum, guard, interface, module, pipe, service, universal and appShell.

Generating components and modules

ng generate component contact-list --dry-run
ng g c contact-list --dry-run
ng g c contact-list --dry-run --flat
ng g c contact-list
ng generate module shared
ng generate component shared/avatar --module=shared

Generating directives

ng generate directive shared/directives/non-numeric --module=shared

Generating services

ng generate service services/api
ng generate service services/api --module=app

Generating pipes

ng generate pipe pipes/phone

Generating models

ng generate class models/contact

Generating interfaces and enums

ng generate interface models/contact
ng generate enum models/contact-type

Generating route guards

ng generate guard auth

Building Angular Applications

A build pipeline for an Angular app

There are many steps involved in building an Angular application. Since Angular applications are written in TypeScript and ES6 and beyond, the build pipeline is quite involved. We need to Transpile TypeScript and ES6+ code, bundle our application into one file, or split across many, minify files by removing newlines and white space, mangle our application bundles to make files even smaller, and also generating source maps. Aside from that, we also need to deal with CSS and other assets, such as compiling from Sass to CSS, possibly inlining CSS, having scoped styles, and copying or inlining images. As you can see the process is very involved, but the Angular CLI takes care of all this for us using Webpack under the hood, all with a simple command, ng build. The ng build command also comes with several options.

Configuring different build options

By default, the ng build command runs a development build due to which the JavaScript bundles are not optimized meaning they are neither minified nor uglified for performance. Also the bundle names do not contain a hash for cache busting.
A production build can be run using ng build --prod. For generating source maps in a production build we need to use the ng build --prod --sourcemap command. Lastly, if you wish to analyze the generated bundle files, using a tool such as webpack bundle analyzer use the ng build --prod --stats-json command. Running this command will generate a stats.json file, which you can then upload on webpack.github.io/analyse/ . On this site, you can analyze the different bundles that the build pack run generated for you. You can analyze chunks, the assets, and see the size of each of them.

Setting up build scripts

In the package.json file, we can setup the below npm scripts:
"build:dev":"ng build --stats-json"
"build:prod": "ng build --prod --stats-json"
Setting up npm scripts will make automation much easier.

Running Tests

Built-in test runners and scaffolding

When you create an Angular application using the CLI, a testing pipeline is already set up for you. To run your unit tests, a karma configuration file, karma.conf.js is generated. Karma is used as a test runner using jasmine as a testing framework, and is set up, by default, to run your tests in Chrome. Additional setup can be seen in test.ts. Essentially, this provides additional setup to initialize the Angular testing environment. You can write your tests in TypeScript and the CLI will take care of transpiling that for you.

The ng test command

In order to run your unit tests, you use the ng test command. This will take all of your spec files, transpile them in memory, and run your unit test in Chrome.

Test run options

Running the ng test command runs the test in watch mode. However, if you prefer not to do that, you can use a single run flag. By running the ng test --single-run command the test will only run once and then exit. This will be needed in a Continuous Integration environment.
You can also generate code coverage reports when running your tests. To do so, you need to use the code coverage flag. Running ng test --single-run --code-coverage command will not only run your tests but will also generate code coverage reports using Istanbul. Once it is complete, it will create a new coverage folder, with an index.html page for your report.

Ejecting from the Angular CLI

The tooling provided by the Angular CLI is quite extensive. It can generate applications, application code, and also set up build and testing pipe lines for you. However, it is not uncommon for a development team to ask specific needs over the build process, in order to have finer control. It is for these purposes that the Angular team created an eject feature. You can use this feature if you feel that you want to manually take care of running and building your application. To do so, you can use the ng eject command.

Conclusion

The Angular CLI is truly a great tool that will allow you to be productive building Angular applications. I recommend subscribing to notifications on this GitHub repository – https://github.com/angular/angular-cli/, as it will allow you to keep up to date with new features and be notified of new releases. The Angular team have some great things planned for the CLI. I also recommend subscribing to the official Angular Blog – https://blog.angular.io/ for keeping up to date.

My Learning’s

I like to sharpen my current skills and master new ones to stay on top of new tools and latest web technologies. I will be posting updates over here of what I am currently learning. Links to either GitHub repositories or hosted applications will be posted as and when they are available.

  • Angular Fundamentals
  • What’s New in React 16
  • Angular Component Communication – Communicating with a Template (Binding, Getters & Setters), ViewChild and ViewChildren, Communicating with a Child Component, Communicating with a Parent Component, Communicating Through a Service, Communicating Through a State Management Service, Communicating Through Service Notifications & Communicating Using the Router.
  • Building Angular and Node Apps with Authentication
  • Building Apps with AngularFire 2
  • Angular: Material Design
  • Angular: Animations
  • Angular 2+: Creating CRUD Apps
  • Single Page Applications with Vue.js
  • Vue.js: Building an Interface
  • Learning ECMAScript 6
  • Learning App Building with Vanilla JavaScript
  • CSS: Advanced Layouts with Grid

What’s New in React 16

Introduction

Facebook recently announced the release of React 16, a complete rewrite of the React library. The new core architecture, code-named Fiber, keeps most of the API intact and backward compatible, so you can update existing apps without running into issues. Fiber introduces lots of new highly anticipated features and improvements to React. This blog post is about what’s new in React 16. It will cover the new features that lets React developers catch and handle JavaScript errors in React components; render elements into different locations in the DOM outside of the main component tree using portals; return multiple elements without having to wrap them in a parent element using new render return types like arrays, strings and numbers; also return null from setState to prevent unnecessary state updates and re-renders and more.

You can start using React 16 today. When you install React in a project or create a new app using the create-react-app tool, it will automatically install the latest version of React and ReactDOM. As mentioned above, React 16 is backwards compatible. So if you are currently running your app on a previous version of React without any console errors or deprecation warnings, updating to React 16 will not break your app. It should be a seamless transition. Now with a complete rewrite of the React Library comes a few minor breaking changes that only affect uncommon use cases. You can view all the breaking changes. A welcome change is that React is now available under the MIT license. The uncertainties created by Facebook’s previous BSD+Patent’s open source license was a concern to many developers, startups and companies using React. So now React licensing is more flexible. You can use React in your project without having to worry about the previous patent’s clause. Now if you are not able to upgrade immediately to version 16, React 15.6.2, was also published under MIT. Also note, the React 16 update does not mean that whatever you have learned so far about React is immediately obsolete. The API itself hasn’t changed, and most of the skills you have learned are still important, fundamental skills you will continue to use. So if you are eager to learn about everything that is new in React 16 next I will cover the new component life cycle method and error handling feature that lets us catch and manage errors when rendering React components.

Take Control of Errors with componentDidCatch()

One of the biggest changes in React 16 is how React handles JavaScript errors. Normally, a JavaScript error inside a component, for example, like an uncaught type error will break the entire app. A JavaScript error in a part of the UI shouldn’t break the whole app. So in React 16 error handling was improved to avoid these types of situations where runtime errors during rendering breaks your app. It provides a built-in solution for handling errors gracefully with a new life cycle method called componentDidCatch(). This life cycle hook gets triggered whenever a childs component render or life cycle methods throw an error. When an error occurs, componentDidCatch() catches the error and instead of crashing the entire app, the app continues to run as normal displaying all the UI except for the faulty component. You can even display a fallback UI to replace the component that crashed.

Catching Errors with Error Boundaries

With the componentDidCatch() lifecycle method comes a new concept of an error boundary. Error boundaries are wrapper components that use componentDidCatch() to capture errors anywhere in their child component tree and display a fallback UI in its place. They provide an easier way to keep the error catching and conditional rendering logic reusable and maintainable in your app. You create an error boundary as a class component. Any errors caught in the component tree get reported up to the Error Boundary’s componentDidCatch() method thereby providing a handy way of sending error reports to an error tracking or monitoring service. The componentDidCatch() method take two arguments to help you track and investigate errors, error – the error instance itself, and info which contains the component stack trace or the path in the component tree leading up to the offending component. The component stack trace contains helpful information for sorting and resolving errors. The componentDidCatch() method and Error Boundary work like try/catch statements for your React components. They provide a more consistent and dependable way to catch and deal with errors.

Note: Error Boundaries only catch errors in the components below them in the tree. An error boundary can’t catch an error within itself.

New Return Types

React 16 supports new return types that let your render less DOM nodes. For example, React no longer requires that the render() method returns a single React element. You are able to render multiple sibling elements without a wrapping element by returning an array. The other new return types React 16 supports are strings and numbers. Eliminating divs or any extra element added just to wrap your React component tree or returned content leads to overall cleaner and smaller components.

Render Children into Other DOM Nodes with Portals

React 16 introduces a new way of rendering into the DOM. You can render children into a DOM element that exists outside of your apps main DOM tree with a new feature called Portals. For example, in your index.html template you will usually have a div with the id root which is where your entire app is rendered into the DOM via ReactDOM.render. To create a portal, you add a second element that’s a sibling of your root div as shown below.

<div id="root"></div>
<div id="my-portal"></div>

Then you can render specific parts of your component tree inside the sibling div with the new createPortal() function. The createPortal(child, container) function accepts two arguments, child and container. The first argument child is the content you want to render. The second argumnet container is the DOM element where the content is going to render. createPortal() provides a hook into HTML that’s outside the root div. As mentioned in React docs, portals are useful when a parent component has an overflow hidden or z-index style, but you need the child to visually break out of its container. So a handy use case for portals is when creating modal windows or overlays. What’s interesting about portals is that the components they render are recognized as regular child components of the app. In other words, even though portal can be anywhere in the DOM tree, it behaves like a normal React child in every other way. For example, an event triggered from inside a portal still propagates or bubbles up to the parent component.

Returning null from setState

React 16 lets you decide if state gets updated via setState to prevent unnecessary DOM updates. In your events you can check if the new value of the state is the same as the existing one. If the values are the same, you can return null. Returning null will not update state and trigger a re-render. React 16 provides state performance improvements that let you prevent an update from being triggered by returning null for setState if the new value of state is the same as the existing value. Preventing unnecessary state updates and re-renders with null can make your app perform faster.

So these are some of the most important updates to React 16. Now there are a few other features I didn’t cover above like support for custom DOM attributes and Better server-side rendering. Finally, as with many popular JavaScript libraries, React is going to be updated frequently. Happy Coding!!!

Resources

Asynchronous Programming – The End of The Loop

To become an effective JavaScript programmer, it is important for a developer to learn how to develop and maintain asynchronous programs. JavaScript is a single-threaded programming language due to which applications written in JavaScript must use async APIs to stay responsive to user inputs while performing long-running tasks such as making a request for data from a server or running animations. You can’t get very far in a JavaScript code base without running across an asynchronous API.

Asynchronous programming may seem intimidating. How can we write programs that accepts input from the user, runs an animation, and sends a request to the server over the same period of time? How do we keep the code base clear and concise? How do we gracefully propagate and handle asynchronous errors? How can we avoid memory leaks caused by dangling event handlers? The different kinds of loops i.e. `for`, `for/in`, `while` and `do/while` and `try/catch/finally` statements in JavaScript are no help since they only work on synchronous functions.

Asynchronous programming is much easier than it seems and the key to it is to think differently about events. By using a handful of simple functions it is possible to build asynchronous programs. The first secret towards mastering asynchronous programming is learning to write programs without making use of loops. JavaScript loops can only work synchronously, and therefore cannot be used to repeat asynchronous functions. In order to gain expertise in asynchronous programming we must first learn how to code without making use of loops.

In the upcoming 9 posts to follow we will learn how to program Arrays without loops using just a few simple functions. We will learn the correct approach towards asynchronous programming and avoid making common mistakes. By the end of these 9 posts we will have the tools, concepts, and libraries required to be an asynchronous programming expert!

Essential Extensions for Brackets

Brackets has an extensive array of extensions for enhancing your front-end development workflow.

  • Emmet – The Emmet extension for Brackets, if you take the time to learn it, provides wonderful shorthand snippets for quickly coding in HTML and CSS.
    1. Emmet Plugin
    2. Emmet — the essential toolkit for web-developers
  • Indent Guides – The Indent Guides extension for Brackets adds helpful guides to your code, making it easier to see where one section ends and another begins.
    1. A Brackets extension to show indent guides in the code editor
  • Beautify – The Beautify extension for Brackets does exactly what its name implies. It takes sloppy, unformatted markup and makes it look beautiful by adding spacing and indents that to make it easier to read.
    1. Brackets Beautify 2.x
  • Autoprefixer – The Autoprefixer extension for Brackets parses through your CSS code and adds vendor prefixes to your styles to make it as browser-friendly as possible.
    1. Brackets Autoprefixer
  • Lorem Pixel
    1. Brackets Lorem Pixel
  • CDN Suggestions – Using a Content Delivery Network is a great way to link to commonly used libraries like jQuery and Bootstrap. CDN Suggestions is a plugin that will give you quick access to all of the most popular CDN links available.
    1. CDN Suggestions
  • HTML Wrapper – The HTML Wrapper extension for Brackets provides a great shortcut for surrounding plain text with list item tags, anchor tags, and more.
    1. HTML Wrapper Extension
  • CanIUse – The CanIUse plugin provides a quick-access panel in Brackets where you can search for information about browser compatibility on the CanIUse website.
    1. CanIUse Extension